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Differences between the 4 mazhab in Islam

Printed From: IslamiCity.com
Category: Religion - Islam
Forum Name: Basics of Islam
Forum Discription: Basics of Islam
URL: http://www.IslamiCity.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=935
Printed Date: 23 April 2014 at 1:44pm


Topic: Differences between the 4 mazhab in Islam
Posted By: farithrezza
Subject: Differences between the 4 mazhab in Islam
Date Posted: 18 May 2005 at 8:37pm
[edited]

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Assalamualaikum to everyone. Peace to all.



Replies:
Posted By: rami
Date Posted: 19 May 2005 at 8:29am
Bi ismillahir rahmanir raheem

assalamu alikum.

This is from sunnipath.com a traditional site which answers question according to the shafii and hanafi madhhabs.

Sorry for the cut and past im a little short on time, insha llah i will talk about what the diffrences actualy mean and were they arise at a later date.

Objection to Following Another Madhab Answered
Answered by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Objection: If a person is a Hanafi, then he should he should only follow his madhab. he should not be taking things from the other madhabs and mix it with his madhab. Because then this person would be following his desires (Nafs) and not following his madhab. As in the case of menstruation, A person is not allowed to recite the qura`n, except those verses which are prescribed as (or read as duas), and a husband is not allowed to have intercourse with his wife.


Walaikum assalam,

You are confusing two issues:

(a) Following another madhhab completely in a complete action, and (b) mixing the positions of more than one madhhab within one action, in such a way that it is not independently valid in either one (talfiq). The latter is impermissible and invalid according to the fuqaha. Ibn Abidin (imam of the late Hanafi school for fatwa) and Ibn Hajar al-Haytami (imam of the late Shafi`i school for fatwa) both transmit scholarly consensus (ijma`) regarding its impermissibility.

Following another madhhab completely in a complete action, however, is valid according to the majority of the scholars of usul al-fiqh, and fuqaha, on the condition that there not be a systematic seeking out of dispensations. This was confirmed by Ibn Abidin in his Hashiya, Tahtawi in his Hashiyat al-Durr, Abd al-Ghani al-Nabulsi in his Sharh al-Tariqa al-Muhammadiyya and in his treatise on ijtihad, taqlid and talfiq, and is the position adopted by the Syrian Hanafi scholars.

The scholars of the Indian Sub-continent generally do not allow this, except under exceptional circumstances, but not because it is per se invalid, but for obvious reasons:

(a) In their millieu, it is not normally possible for one to find a qualified source or scholar from another school;

(b) To close the door to the systematic seeking of dispensations.

But, even Indo-Pak scholars who advocate this position admit, this is more an answer of prudence than a theoretical impermissibility.

I wonder whether the position enunciated in the major texts of the school is not more suited to our situation in the West. People have a lot of difficult situations and challenges in their lives, and this makes things easy for them while remaining within the boundaries of sound sunni scholarship, instead of running to the modernists and salafis...

Sticking to One School

It is not religiously binding on the Muslim to stick to one school on all matters, without exception, as both al-Tahtawi and Ibn Abidin (Allah have mercy on them), the two leading late authorities for fatwa in the Hanafi school, both explain. Rather, there is nothing wrong with taking a dispensation if there is a need; what is impermissible is to make it a habit to seek out dispensations [i.e. even if there is no hardship or need].

The Path of Taqwa

The path of taqwa, as the scholars and sufis explain, is to avoid taking dispensations unless there is genuine hardship in following one's own school. In fact, they say that those who have learned their own school should seek out the strictest positions from other school whenever reasonably possible, so that one's worship and practice is sound without argument.

May Allah grant us beneficial knowledge, and the success to act according to it, on the footsteps of the His Beloved (Allah bless him and give him peace), with the secret of sincerity, without which actions are but lifeless forms.

And Allah knows best.

Wassalam,
Faraz Rabbani.

Why Madhabs? Isn't It Like Christianity?
Answered by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani  

You keep talking about madhab.. the hanafi madhab, the sh'afi madhab....and so on. It gets confusing...I mean it makes Islam sound like Christianity...like they have divided their religion in so many sects...Islam shouldn't be divided like that...it disturbs me a lot. Please help me out here..

Walaikum assalam,

The madhhabs have been a reality of our Ummah since the time of the Sahaba: people studied the Qur'an and Prophetic teachings under different Companions of the Prophet (Allah bless him, his folk, and companions, and give them peace) and the Companions themselves differed in understanding the details of the teachings of the Qur'an and Sunna. These differences were of understanding and methodology and continued to the next generations, until these methodologies were systematized and the rulings derived from them formally recorded by the great scholars of the Age of Mujtahids. Four of these great mujtahids had their schools transmitted and taught more extensively and thus survived, due to the greater strength of their methodology.

The madhhabs, in reality, are a mercy and means of unity in our Ummah. Throughout history, scholars of different madhhabs have studied together, and loved and respected each other. My main teacher, for example, is a Shafi`i...

Wassalam,
Faraz Rabbani



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Rasul Allah (sallah llahu alaihi wa sallam) said: "Whoever knows himself, knows his Lord" and whoever knows his Lord has been given His gnosis and nearness.


Posted By: farithrezza
Date Posted: 25 May 2005 at 2:45am
[edited]

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Assalamualaikum to everyone. Peace to all.


Posted By: Community
Date Posted: 25 May 2005 at 9:20pm

i suggest you ask yourself these questions: do i fear Allah? do i hope for His mercy? if the answers are "yes" to both questions, then you do not need ask yourself about madhaahib, just fear Him and hope for His mercy in everything you do, because Allah does not look to your outer form, but He looks what is in your heart. This should be enough.



Posted By: rami
Date Posted: 26 May 2005 at 2:09am
Bi ismillahir rahmanir raheem

asslamu alaikum

From what I have as a knowledge is that, mazhabs of each muslim is determined according to their location, ain't it? Me, for example, I'm in mazhab Syafie because I live in south east asia and does all of us (muslims in SE Asia) holding to the same mazhab?? What if i'm migrating to USA (as I mentioned before), for example?? I do not have to change it rite?? Seriously I'm interested to learn how does these mazhabs appear??

That is not correct akhi, madhabs are not based on location it just so happens that the people in your part of the world prefer the shafii madhhab. If you go any were in the world you do not have to change your madhab you can stay a shafii, these four madhhabs (Shafii, Maliki, Hanafi, Hanbali) are what make up the Sunni and Islamic community and each accepts the other, any other group is a minority whether in Sunni or Shia islam. America has many people following different madhhabs same where i live Austarlia.

here are some articles about the madhhabs, insha allah you have the time to read them.

http://www.masud.co.uk/ISLAM/ahm/newmadhh.htm - Understanding the Four Madhhabs By Shaikh Abdal-Hakim Murad.

ive had the pleasure of hearing this shaykh speak, he is extremely inteligent. This article also outline the history and how the madhhabs came about.

http://www.masud.co.uk/ISLAM/nuh/madhhab.htm" target="mainFrame - What is a Madhhab? Shaykh Nuh Ha Mim Keller
 

http://www.masud.co.uk/ISLAM/nuh/madhhabstlk.htm" target="mainFrame - Why Muslims Follow Madhhabs Shaykh Nuh Ha Mim Keller

http://www.masud.co.uk/ISLAM/nuh/madhhabstlk.htm" target="mainFrame -

http://www.masud.co.uk/ISLAM/nuh/studyh.htm" target="mainFrame - Would you advise individuals to study hadith from al-Bukhari and Muslim on their own? This is what br community would have us do and is partly a reply to his comments.

i suggest you ask yourself these questions: do i fear Allah? do i hope for His mercy? if the answers are "yes" to both questions, then you do not need ask yourself about madhaahib, just fear Him and hope for His mercy in everything you do, because Allah does not look to your outer form, but He looks what is in your heart. This should be enough.

I suggest br that you find a traditional scholar and ask him about the madhhabs, what you advise is certainly not correct.




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Rasul Allah (sallah llahu alaihi wa sallam) said: "Whoever knows himself, knows his Lord" and whoever knows his Lord has been given His gnosis and nearness.



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