Print Page | Close Window

Islamic Mindfulness

Printed From: IslamiCity.org
Category: General
Forum Name: General Discussion
Forum Discription: General Discussion
URL: http://www.readverse.org/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=4297
Printed Date: 19 January 2022 at 6:47am
Software Version: Web Wiz Forums 8.04 - http://www.webwizforums.com


Topic: Islamic Mindfulness
Posted By: Khadija1021
Subject: Islamic Mindfulness
Date Posted: 07 April 2006 at 2:38pm

Assalamu Alaikum

 

 

I found the following article very interesting and would like to hear what other MUSLIMS (and those non-Muslims who truly care about Muslims...no bashers) have to say about it.  I feel this is a topic worthy of discussion. When I joined IC, I had hoped that we would have more discussions based upon issues like this one.  We need more threads that are educational with healthy discussions instead of thread that encourage arguing, bashing and sometimes even backbiting.  A true Muslim community is one where enjoining right and forbidding wrong is upheld and where all of its members encourage one another.  Maybe we should ask ourselves—before starting a new thread or replying to something someone has said—if we are doing so 1.) with good adab and 2.) in a manner that will enhance the over all adab of IC forum group.  This entails not starting threads which we know will single out some causing them to either feel ostracized or lead them to leaving the forum group all together.  Inshallah, we will always keep in mind that this may be the only support some who come here have.  Personally, I think we all should come here with the same level of adab that we use when (or would use if) we go to the mosque for Jummah.

 

 

When I was in undergraduate school, I had a sociology teacher who told the class that he used to run into this particular fast food restaurant at a certain time on a certain day of the week.  He had always simply ran in and then ran back out (which is why they call it fast food…right?!).  He said that on one of those visits, he noticed this family and then noticed them there every week.  He said, after a few weeks, he realized that it may have been a fast cheap meal to him, but it was obvious to him that to this family, it was a big deal to be able to go as a family to eat there.  He said that after that, he had a very differ attitude about going there for his “quick” “cheap” meal and that although it was ‘merely’ a fast food restaurant, he started being more conscientious of his manners while there. 

 

 

I heard that story almost 20 years ago but it has never left my mind because it captures something of importance about the way we move about and treat others in this world.  It’s something that resonates in me in the same way as that which resonated in me when I read this article.  What do we take for granted in this world?  How do we treat learning in Islam?  How do we treat Islam?  How do we treat Allah’s creation?  Do we approach it as if we are bulldozers in the middle of the rain forest waiting to plow down trees or do we approach it like a scientist who goes there to find a cure for some illness or a child who is full of wonder? 

 

 

I take long walks with my twin granddaughters during which we make dhikr.  They are only seven years old and attend a private Christian school, but they love to praise Allah in Arabic.  We make lessons out of our walks.  We talk about the importance of praising Allah and ways in which we can show praise to Allah.  So, as we walk along saying “Subhan Allah” or “Alhamdulillah” or “Allahu Akar” etc., we stop to admire the flowers and to look at the critters (birds, squirrels, bugs etc.) because as one of the twins put it, when we do good by admire Allah’s creation, we are truly praising Him.  Allah said:

 

 

2:164 Behold! in the creation of the heavens and the earth; in the alternation of the night and the day; in the sailing of the ships through the ocean for the profit of mankind; in the rain which Allah Sends down from the skies, and the life which He gives therewith to an earth that is dead; in the beasts of all kinds that He scatters through the earth; in the change of the winds, and the clouds which they Trail like their slaves between the sky and the earth;- (Here) indeed are signs for a people that are wise.

 

 

ALLAHU AKBAR

 

 

Allah Hafiz

Sister Khadija

Mind Building - A neglected dimension of Islam
By:  Dr. Mohammad Omar Farooq

Allahu Akbar, Allahaaaahuu Akbar! ... Oh, the vibrating wake-up call to begin another day. It's somewhat different though, as in this age of modern technology and rapid change, this call is from a digital clock right by the bedside. It is not a substitute for the hearty adhan coming live from a minaret, but for a weak believer like me, I am so grateful to have this, instead of a regular alarm clock, in a small rural town in the USA.

Offering the prayer, I head for the kitchen area. On the electric stove, an egg is being transformed into delicious omelet with the loving and mysterious touch of my beloved better half. (Somehow whenever I cook, even following her instructions, it doesn't taste so good!). In the microwave, a cup of water is brewing for tea - to be made the English way. Last night there was terrible headache, and some remnant was still there. My wife insists on checking if I have any temperature, and defying my "qawwamuna alan nisa" status, I listened to her. Alhamdulillah, the thermometer gave a favorable reading, but I reached out for some Tylenol.

Expecting some guests this afternoon, I grabbed the convenient handle of vacuum cleaner. I already used the "miracle mop" last night before going to sleep. Hurriedly, I dressed up while I turned on the computer. Most annoyingly, yet helpfully, the computer reminds me that I have two bills to be paid and today is the scheduled date to be mailed out. Without being meticulous about my otherwise shapely handwriting, I write two checks, put it in an addressed envelope. Thank God, I don't have to lick that rather awkward-tasting stamp, because I got those self-adhesive ones. Quickly, I check my email. My parents, halfway across the globe in
Bangladesh, have written me an email that was sent just a few minutes ago. I remember twenty years ago when I came to this country, I had to endure weeks to receive a letter.

No more time left. I hear a pleading reminder from downstairs, "Abbuji (daddy), it's time to go!" My two daughters are ready to go to school and I have to drop them off on my way to the university. There was no problem on the way. After two major car accidents last year, I have to be extra careful; of course, there is passionate and strict instruction from my beloved to drive most conservatively. In
North America, this is generally not a big problem, as most drivers on the road are also obeying the basic traffic laws.

After reaching office, I checked messages on my voice machine, prepared an exam on the computer, quickly printed it out on a laser printer (sparing some time for me to work on this article), wrote a few things with a pen that did not spill any ink, and headed for my class room. The computer station in the classroom wasn't working properly, so I had to immediately call up the technical support and without any hassle or bribe, it was promptly taken care of.

In the afternoon, there was a faculty meeting. I am one of the two international faculty here, and my participation at this meeting as a faculty is deeply appreciated, even though I had to publicly register my concerns about some of the recent steps taken by the administration.

By now, I won't be surprised if the readers have become circumspect as to - in detailing all these routine things that are so common in most others' life as well - what do I really have in mind. Aha, the "mind"! This article is about "mind-building". As my life is not much different from most others', as my beloved's omelet is probably only as delicious as most others' (may be just a little better!), as my daily routines are also quite similarly to most others', I think it would be alright if I spare the readers from the rest of the detail. 

In subjecting the respected readers to be informed about my daily routines, I was merely trying to make a point. First, let us recount some of the modern gadgets that have become routine in most of our lives. Clock, stove, microwave, thermometer, pain reliever, computer, vacuum cleaner, miracle mop, car, laser printer, ball-point pen, bank checks, self-adhesive stamps - not a single one of these gadgets or the underlying operating systems is a contribution by Muslims. Readers can take an account of their own lives and see if they can identify anything they currently use that has been discovered, invented, or even innovated by Muslims! One can also look at the organizational dimension of their lives and see whether in their society they allow people of international (particularly, of different religious) origin to be integrated as closely as we have been allowed to, or whether they can voice their concerns not merely to protest but for the sake of problem-solving, or whether they can drive with reasonable expectation that the fellow drivers on the road will obey the laws.

Within the limited scope of this paper, I would like to draw attention to a few aspects related to an important dimension of our Muslim existence and the prophetic heritage: mind-building, which must be developed in parallel with other important aspects of Islamic character-building. Those gadgets as well as organizational development or institutionalization (Iqamah) are results of a certain mind-set that are relevant to everyone. That mind-set is not necessarily a western mind-set. Rather, it is deeply and essentially Islamic too.

First, there are a number of Muslims who are overwhelmingly dogmatic. Having some balanced rationalism with solid grounding in logic is a must. Recently, a prolific writer on an internet forum, who also seems to speak for Islam, commented: "We the Muslims have taken Qur'an for granted as the authentic revelation from Allah. No arguments, no logic and no philosophy. The only thing is we have to understand it and be guided accordingly." Nothing could be farther from the truth. Muslims don't become Muslim by birth. They have to embrace it, and do so with conscious and conscientious effort in search of truth.

One of the most compelling dimensions of the Qur'an is to frequently engage us in reasoned dialog as it poses questions after questions and provokes us to think and reason with the Qur'an. "Say: 'See ye? - If your stream be some morning lost (in the underground earth), who then can supply you with clear-flowing water?" (Quran 67:30)

Secondly, besides having a balanced rationality, inculcating the spirit of inquiry - not blind submission - is an essential dimension of Islam. It is not just a prophetic tradition, but also it is exemplified in the life and personality of Ibrahim [pbuh], whose legacy is the foundation of the teachings of even the Prophet Muhammad [pbuh]. (Quran 2:130, 135) Indeed, sometimes having doubt, even after proclaiming faith, is neither unnatural nor un-Islamic. That "no arguments, no logic and no philosophy" attitude or concept is simply alien to Islam or the Qur'an.

Call it scientific, but in appropriate contexts, demanding proof and use of one of the primary human faculty - reasoning - are essential Islamic, prophetic, and Qur'anic dimensions. The faculty of reasoning never becomes redundant: not while searching for truth, and not after we believe that we have found the truth. Those who do not employ the faculty of reasoning may grab the very first candidate that claims to be the truth, and if that candidate is embraced without appropriate scrutiny, in all likelihood, whatever was embraced will be upheld regardless whether it was really the truth in the first place or not. That is why logic and reason are never unwanted or disposable for Muslims. Islam simply teaches, and expects from, us to use those adequately and properly.

May I beg the readers' indulgence to read the following verse about Ibrahim , who even after attaining prophethood, asked Allah: "Behold! Abraham said: 'My Rabb! Show me, how you give life to the dead.' He said: 'Do you not then believe?' He said: 'Yes! but to satisfy my own understanding.' He said: 'Take four birds, tame the to turn to you; put a portion of them on every hill, and call to them; they will come to you (flying) with speed. Then know that God is Exalted in Power, Wise.'" (Quran 2:260)

This is the foundation of Islamic spirit of inquiry, search for truth, pursuit of knowledge, and understanding. We are, of course, not prophets. Genuine search for truth does not begin by taking things for granted, but by our effort to learn and verify - the essence of scientific approach. In this process, occasional doubts are very natural. As far as Islamic validity of what I am suggesting, let no one tell you any differently, because this is what the Prophet himself has said: "Allah's Apostle said, "We have more right to be in doubt than Abraham when he said, 'My Lord! Show me how you give life to the dead.' He said, 'Do you not believe?' He said, 'Yes (I believe) but to be stronger in Faith.' (Quran 2:260)" [Sahih al-Bukhari, Vol. 6, #61]

Thirdly, Muslims have lost their bond with nature. Yes, there are scientists - natural and social, but not reared through an educational system or environment that popularly (and inspired by Islam) internalizes and nurtures observational bond with nature. There are so many people chanting "subhanallah", but how many does one see straying for a moment to observe how a bird flies, or caterpillar turns into butterfly, or a seed sprouts - and spontaneously - without even being conscious - say once: "Subhanallah." The first type of subhanallah chanters of the ummah of the Prophet Muhammad would be the users of all these gadgets invented or produced by the non-Muslims. Indeed, they would give louder Adhans with loudspeakers invented by the non-Muslims. The second kind of "Subhanallah" will produce the discoverers, explorers, inventors, and innovators.

Muslims need to develop a keen interest in understanding and appreciating the nature - the world of creations of which we are a part. Muslims are ready to reject any evolutionary theory, but they do not have an adequately developed and articulated alternative explanation. Study closely the following verse: "Say: 'Travel through the earth and see how Allah did originate creation; so will Allah produce a later creation; for Allah has power over all things'" (Quran 29:20) While Allah invites and challenges us to study, understand, and appreciate how "Allah did originate creation," what have Muslims to offer on the part of the Ummah from the study during last fourteen centuries as an adequately detailed and developed account for the process of originating creation? Our explanation is simple, elegant and melodramatic! "Kun fa-yakun!" God said: "Be and there it was". All that there is to it!

One reason that partly, but importantly, accounts for this failure is that the people we call scholars or Ulama over time have completely alienated themselves from nature. Nature is not merely to be contemplated upon, but to be experienced - to be touched, felt, smelt, and observed. Consider the following verses of of the Quran from Sura al-Mulk ( http://www.islamicity.com/quran.asp?s=67:3-67:4 - 3-4 ): "He who created the seven heavens one above another: No want of proportion will you see in the creation of the Most Gracious. So turn your vision again: Do you see any flaw? Again turn your vision a second time: (your) vision will come back to you dull and discomfited in a state of worn out."

The purpose of these verses is not that people would have such a gullibly, believing mind and attitude that they would not even bother to look for what Allah is referring to. These verses are invitation as well as challenge to humanity to study, understand, and appreciate the creation of Allah. However, the impact of these verses on our mind has been quite the opposite. Since we believe in Allah and Allah's creation is flawless, why do we need to turn our vision toward his creation? The sad lesson is that, regardless of the reason, whoever develops a keen attachment to nature - studies, explores, probes into - has a different appreciation than those who simply believe in. Furthermore, our belief in the flawlessness of Allah's creation does not take us even one step closer to put nature to our use, as others are already doing. Technological progress and understanding of nature are inseparable.

Fourthly, it seems a number of Muslims have a serious stumbling block to mind-building. The autonomous forces of modern changes in this society are driven by at least two factors. One is the problem-solving attitude and approach, which we lack due to our overwhelmingly dogmatic mind-set (and the so-called Islamic movements are absolutely no exceptions!). The other is innovation. While innovation is the key to incremental improvements in human society, Muslim mind-set psychologically is at odd with this very word. Why? The Arabic/Islamic word for this is "Bid'ah". While we are repeating every week in Jumuah prayers "All innovations are misguidance (dalala) and all misguidanced are hell-bound", who says Muslims are not smart? Their mind-set, quite intelligently and aptly, is not set up for "innovations" leading to who knows where. While avoiding bid'ah, in appropriate contexts, has importance, we rarely even clarify that while one type of innovation may be hell-bound, the other is essential to our existence. It is important to emphasize the need for more and more bid'ah in another sense.

Muslims cannot ignore the fact that those who have overwhelming technological superiority over us, they also dominate our lives in every possible way, often negatively. Technology as an autonomous force of change would continue to shape and reshape the world around us, unless we are in the driving seat of history. And, toward that end we also need to rebuild our mind-set based on a better and different understanding of the Qur'an and the Prophetic heritage.

Mind-building is a challenging and complex subject, and only a few pertinent aspects have been touched here. Feedbacks are most welcome.

 

Dr. Mohammad Omar Farooq is an associate professor of economics and finance at Upper Iowa University. Homepage: http://www.globalwebpost.com/farooqm - http://www.globalwebpost.com/farooqm



-------------
Say: 'My prayer and my rites, my living and my dying, are for Allah alone, the Lord of all the worlds. (Qur'an, 6:162)



Replies:
Posted By: ummziba
Date Posted: 07 April 2006 at 4:06pm

Assalamu alaikum,

Nice, thought provoking post, Sister Khadija.  Indeed good, polite and thought provoking posts are sorely needed here.  The bashing and name calling does get rather tedious.

I will have to think some more on the post to make a contribution, but, I do wish to point out something in Dr. Farooq's piece that should be corrected.  He mentions a bunch of modern conveniences and says that Muslims had nothing to do with any of them (in the 8th paragraph).  In fact, Muslims were behind the invention of both fountain pens (which led to ball points) and cheques (or checks if you prefer that spelling!).  See this fine article posted here:

http://www.islamicity.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=4223&PN=1 - http://www.islamicity.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=4223& ;PN=1

It would be good for all Muslims to familiarize themselves with some of our accomplishments so that we can be inspired to return to that glorious time when the ummah was very prolific in science, technology, medicine, and so much more!  Here is a good site to start with:

http://www.muslimheritage.com - http://www.muslimheritage.com

I do hope your post causes some good discussions and some thinking on all our parts.  Muslims should get into the habit of "mind building" as our Merciful Allah tells us so many times in the Qur'an to think and reason and use our brains!

Indeed, all Muslims would do well to use the brain that Allah gave them to the best of their ability ~ one never knows when that precious gift may be taken away!

Peace, ummziba.



-------------
Sticks and stones may break my bones, but your words...they break my soul ~


Posted By: superme
Date Posted: 07 April 2006 at 7:46pm

Salaam sister ummziba.

May I dissappoint you by disagreeing you?. The constant reference to the old achievement is good refering habit to the defeated gladiators in the ring. When the hand can't lift the sword to defend himself he can't say: "My grandpa was a very good fighter". He must use his sword or lose his head, the choice is so obvious sister.

Throw away that imaginery walking stick that we inherited from our lazy grandparent and lets run the race with our own legs. If you can't run than walking is fine for me. Shall we? 



-------------


Posted By: salman
Date Posted: 08 April 2006 at 12:24am
Originally posted by Khadija1021

 

I take long walks with my twin granddaughters during which we make dhikr. 

 

assalamualaikum sister khadija

 

are you a grandmother?



-------------
It is better to be alone than to be in bad company.


Posted By: ummziba
Date Posted: 08 April 2006 at 5:17am

Wa alaikum salaam, Brother Superme,

I understand the point you are making, but I think you misunderstand mine.  I don't believe I intended to make it sound like we need to go backwards, rather, I believe it is good to know the past in order to do just as you said - "and run the race with our own legs".

The past accomplishments of the ummah were not by any lazy people.  They were intelligent, inquisitive and real forward moving peoples.  Now, the lazy people you are referring to, I believe, are the more recent generations.  I am encouraging looking far past the recent laziness to the original glory of the ummah as inspiration to move forward ourselves.

Certainly we should not be looking for a "walking stick", but rather inspiration!  If a lazy people and a walking stick are what you see, please, look farther back.

Yes, then, shall we all move forward together?

Peace, ummziba.



-------------
Sticks and stones may break my bones, but your words...they break my soul ~


Posted By: Angel
Date Posted: 08 April 2006 at 6:09am

learn from history and not make the same mistakes, and don't use history as a scapegoat for not making progress. Don't use the 'well it has always been done like that' excuse, you don't progress much. Learn from others history mistakes and also not do them. SOmetimes you do not need experience to learn.

NOt sure what this has to do with the topic but the quote below seems similar 

I don't believe I intended to make it sound like we need to go backwards, rather, I believe it is good to know the past in order to do just as you said - "and run the race with our own legs".



-------------
~ Our feet are earthbound, but our hearts and our minds have wings ~


Posted By: Khadija1021
Date Posted: 08 April 2006 at 11:19am
Originally posted by salman

Originally posted by Khadija1021

I take long walks with my twin granddaughters during which we make dhikr. 

 

assalamualaikum sister khadija

 

are you a grandmother?

 

Wa Alaikum Assalam

 

Yes Brother Salman, I am a grandmother.  I was married very young and became a grandmother at the age of 35.  Alhamdulillah, because I am still young enough to really enjoy them.  I spend time with them everyday.  I pray that some day they will embrace Islam.  Ameen!

 

Allah Hafiz

Sister Khadija



-------------
Say: 'My prayer and my rites, my living and my dying, are for Allah alone, the Lord of all the worlds. (Qur'an, 6:162)


Posted By: salman
Date Posted: 09 April 2006 at 4:22am
Originally posted by Khadija1021

Originally posted by salman

Originally posted by Khadija1021

I take long walks with my twin granddaughters during which we make dhikr. 

 

assalamualaikum sister khadija

 

are you a grandmother?

 

Wa Alaikum Assalam

 

Yes Brother Salman, I am a grandmother.  I was married very young and became a grandmother at the age of 35.  Alhamdulillah, because I am still young enough to really enjoy them.  I spend time with them everyday.  I pray that some day they will embrace Islam.  Ameen!

 

Allah Hafiz

Sister Khadija

assalamualaikum sister khadija

masha Allah at a young age you have got grandchildren.

your grandchildren are not muslims?



-------------
It is better to be alone than to be in bad company.


Posted By: Angela
Date Posted: 23 August 2006 at 1:57pm

**bump**



-------------



Print Page | Close Window

Bulletin Board Software by Web Wiz Forums version 8.04 - http://www.webwizforums.com
Copyright ©2001-2006 Web Wiz Guide - http://www.webwizguide.info