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What do arabic Christians

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Category: Religion - Islam
Forum Name: Interfaith Dialogue
Forum Discription: It is for Interfaith dialogue, where Muslims discuss with non-Muslims. We encourge that dialogue takes place in a cordial atmosphere on various topics including religious tolerance.
URL: http://www.IslamiCity.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=12753
Printed Date: 28 July 2014 at 10:07pm


Topic: What do arabic Christians
Posted By: believer
Subject: What do arabic Christians
Date Posted: 06 July 2008 at 7:16am
call Jesus?  WHy do Muslims call Him by Isa?  Where did Isa come from?
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_in_Islam - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_in_Islam
 
The http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_language - Anglicized name of Jesus is derived from the Latin Iēsus, which in turn comes from the Greek Ἰησοῦς (Iēsoűs). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_in_Islam#cite_note-EoQ-1 - [2] The Qur'anic reference as 'Isa has puzzled Western scholars and several theories have been proposed. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_in_Islam#cite_note-EoQ-1 - [2] One theory is that "y-sh-' , the Hebrew consonants of Yeshua, have been reversed to give 's-y, the Arabic consonants of `Īsā." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_in_Islam#cite_note-EoQ-1 - [2] Another theory, according to the Encyclopedia of the Qur'an, is that "the Jews called Jesus " http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Esau - Esau " (Hebrew 'Esaw) out of hatred and that Muhammad learned this name from them not realizing that it was an insult." In support of this is the argument that the Arabic Esau is written as 'Isu, and that this may have been assimilated to `Īsā. Opposing this theory is the lack of evidence that the Jews ever called Jesus Esau. Further, a passage in the Quran charges Jews for insulting Jesus' mother [ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quran - Qur'an   http://www.usc.edu/dept/MSA/quran/004.qmt.html#004.156 - 4:156 ] and that those Christians who were acquaintances of Muhammad would have corrected him had Muhammad not realized that it is a Jewish insult to Jesus. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_in_Islam#cite_note-EoQ-1 - [2]

A third theory is that the Qur'an deliberately used the word `Īsā to assimilate it to Musa (Moses) because they were sometimes paired. This also occurs in some modern languages, such as http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slovak_language - Slovak (Ježiš - Mojžiš) or http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Czech_language - Czech (Ježíš - Mojžíš). Other examples of assonant pairs include Ṭālūt-Ḏj̲ālūt (Saul and Goliath), Yād̲j̲ūdj-Mād̲j̲ūd̲j̲ (Gog and Magog), and so on. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_in_Islam#cite_note-EoQ-1 - [2] The last theory is that Christians in Arabia had coined the term `Īsā from the Syriac forms of Yeshu or Ishu. The Arabic words that are borrowed from Aramaic or Syriac are often employed by 'ayn . Furthermore, the Manichaean fragments provide an evidence for dropping the final 'ayin of the borrowed Hebrew terms. But there is no evidence that the term `Īsā had been in use in http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jahiliyyah - pre-Islamic times. "There is however a monastery in Syria known as `Īsāniyya as early as 571 C.E." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_in_Islam#cite_note-EoQ-1 - [2]



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John 3
16"For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.



Replies:
Posted By: believer
Date Posted: 16 July 2008 at 6:22pm
Any one have any other ideas about this use of Isa in the Quran?

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John 3
16"For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.


Posted By: Nazarene
Date Posted: 24 September 2008 at 5:10am
Originally posted by believer

Any one have any other ideas about this use of Isa in the Quran?
well the tibetian gospel calls him Issa. read the complete gospel at the link below.
http://www.essene.com/Issa.htm -
 
http://www.essene.com/Issa.htm


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love for all conquers all


Posted By: _ALI_
Date Posted: 25 September 2008 at 12:27am
Salam
Argument regarding the name of Jesus is given by Shiekh Ahmed Deedat

Eesa Latinised to "Jesus"

The Holy Quran refers to Jesus as Eesa, and this name is used more times than any other title, because this was his "Christian" name. Actually, his proper name was Eesa (Arabic), or Esau (Hebrew); classical Yeheshua, which the Christian nations of the West latinised as Jesus. Neither the "J" nor the second "s" in the name Jesus is to be found in the original tongue - they are not found in the Semitic languages.

The word is very simply "E S A U" a very common Jewish name, used more than sixty times in the very first booklet alone of the Bible, in the part called "Genesis". There was at least one "Jesus" sitting on the "bench" at the trial of Jesus before the Sanhedrin. Josephus the Jewish historian mentions some twenty five Jesus' in his "Book of Antiquities". The New Testament speaks of "Bar-Jesus" a magician and a sorcerer, a false prophet (Acts 13:6); and also "Jesus-Justus" a Christian missionary, a contemporary of Paul (Colossians 4:11). These are distinct from Jesus the son of Mary. Transforming "Esau" to (J)esu(s) - Jesus - makes it unique. This unique (?) name has gone out of currency among the Jews and the Christians from the 2nd century after Christ. Among the Jews, because it came to be a name of ill - repute, the name of one who blasphemed in Jewry; and among the Christians because it came to be the proper name of their God. The Muslim will not hesitate to name his son Eesa because it is an honored name, the name of a righteous servant of the Lord.

SOURCE http://www.jamaat.net/cis/ChristInIslam.html


Posted By: Mansoor_ali
Date Posted: 28 September 2008 at 7:59am
Originally posted by believer

call Jesus?  WHy do Muslims call Him by Isa?  Where did Isa come from?
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_in_Islam - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_in_Islam
 
The http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_language - Anglicized name of Jesus is derived from the Latin Iēsus, which in turn comes from the Greek Ἰησοῦς (Iēsoűs). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_in_Islam#cite_note-EoQ-1 - [2] The Qur'anic reference as 'Isa has puzzled Western scholars and several theories have been proposed. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_in_Islam#cite_note-EoQ-1 - [2] One theory is that "y-sh-' , the Hebrew consonants of Yeshua, have been reversed to give 's-y, the Arabic consonants of `Īsā." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_in_Islam#cite_note-EoQ-1 - [2] Another theory, according to the Encyclopedia of the Qur'an, is that "the Jews called Jesus " http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Esau - Esau " (Hebrew 'Esaw) out of hatred and that Muhammad learned this name from them not realizing that it was an insult." In support of this is the argument that the Arabic Esau is written as 'Isu, and that this may have been assimilated to `Īsā. Opposing this theory is the lack of evidence that the Jews ever called Jesus Esau. Further, a passage in the Quran charges Jews for insulting Jesus' mother [ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quran - Qur'an   http://www.usc.edu/dept/MSA/quran/004.qmt.html#004.156 - 4:156 ] and that those Christians who were acquaintances of Muhammad would have corrected him had Muhammad not realized that it is a Jewish insult to Jesus. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_in_Islam#cite_note-EoQ-1 - [2]

A third theory is that the Qur'an deliberately used the word `Īsā to assimilate it to Musa (Moses) because they were sometimes paired. This also occurs in some modern languages, such as http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slovak_language - Slovak (Ježiš - Mojžiš) or http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Czech_language - Czech (Ježíš - Mojžíš). Other examples of assonant pairs include Ṭālūt-Ḏj̲ālūt (Saul and Goliath), Yād̲j̲ūdj-Mād̲j̲ūd̲j̲ (Gog and Magog), and so on. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_in_Islam#cite_note-EoQ-1 - [2] The last theory is that Christians in Arabia had coined the term `Īsā from the Syriac forms of Yeshu or Ishu. The Arabic words that are borrowed from Aramaic or Syriac are often employed by 'ayn . Furthermore, the Manichaean fragments provide an evidence for dropping the final 'ayin of the borrowed Hebrew terms. But there is no evidence that the term `Īsā had been in use in http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jahiliyyah - pre-Islamic times. "There is however a monastery in Syria known as `Īsāniyya as early as 571 C.E." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_in_Islam#cite_note-EoQ-1 - [2]



 

The Name of Jesus (pbuh)

http://answering-christianity.com/name_of_jesus.htm - A Refutation to Quennel Gale's Article "Is Jesus the ISA of Islam?"



Posted By: honeto
Date Posted: 04 December 2008 at 6:55pm
believer,
what you put forward are theories, according to yourself, and that 's what they really are.
As far as facts, all I can say is that Quran is a fact. "Jesus" is a European version of 'Eessa'   just like 'Gibraltor' is for 'Jable ut Tariq' or 'Al Qeemyyah' turned into 'Chemistry'.
Throughout the East, where Jesus was born and lived both Muslims and Christians may name their sons, Eessa not 'Jesus' to this day.
 
Hasan


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39:64 Proclaim: Is it some one other than God that you order me to worship, O you ignorant ones?"


Posted By: Angela
Date Posted: 05 December 2008 at 12:45pm
Believer....you are aware that Jesus is not his name?

Jesus was Yeshua...Yeshua is anglecized to Joshua .

They call Abraham, Ibrahim. I have seen Isaac spelled a number of ways by the Jews.

Jesus is just as must a change as Isa would be from the original Yeshua.


Posted By: honeto
Date Posted: 11 December 2008 at 5:08pm
Originally posted by Angela

Believer....you are aware that Jesus is not his name?

Jesus was Yeshua...Yeshua is anglecized to Joshua .

They call Abraham, Ibrahim. I have seen Isaac spelled a number of ways by the Jews.

Jesus is just as must a change as Isa would be from the original Yeshua.
 
Angela,
is there anything to prove that prophet Essa's (pbuh) name was 'Yeshua'. As I said I know that the followers of Jesus in all of the East, as well as many Muslims name somtimes their sons Essa and not 'Yeshua' as far as I know.
Hasan


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39:64 Proclaim: Is it some one other than God that you order me to worship, O you ignorant ones?"


Posted By: Angela
Date Posted: 12 December 2008 at 4:33am
There are actually many references.  I will research them for you.

Coincidently, the familiar of Yeshua is Esau.....

Like my name is Angela, but my family calls me Ang or Angie.

Esau is not that far from Essa.....just different Anglicizing of the name.

In the end, Jesus...... was a Jew.... he was not Greek.

He would have had an Aramaic/Hebrew name.....any other claim is ridiculous and racism.   And I mean that to both Christian and others.

I call him Jesus because I speak english and that is what his name has been changed to for English speakers.  My dear friend who is a Spanish speaker calls him Jesus (the J being pronounced like and H, so Heyzus).

Christ is the Greek word for Messiah.  Messiah in Hebrew means "The Anointed One".

Mary is the Anglicization of Miriam.  Which is a name commonly shared by Muslim women and Jewish Women.

Laughably, most of the names in our Bibles today, based on the Greek Septuagint, Early Greek Gospels, Vulgate and King James Version have been twisted by Culture after Culture.

I grew up in the Russian Orthodox Church.  The name John.... (Yahya is Arabic) is Ivan in Russian and is Ian in the old Celtic converts to Christianity.

That is why I get so frustrated when people argue over things like this....

We are separated by 2000 years of language...for the Quran, its 600 years and 1 language.   For, the Bible, 3-4 languages minimum.

Here is a etymology of the name from a Wiki article, I have seen others.


Personal name

Authors have put forward numerous explanations to explain the origin of the name 'Jesus' (cf. http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Matthew%201:21;&version=31; - Matthew 1:21 ), and have offered a still larger number of explanations for the meaning of the name. The name is related to the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hebrew_language - Hebrew יְהוֹשֻׁעַ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joshua - Joshua , which is a http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theophoric_name - theophoric name first mentioned within the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bible - Biblical tradition in http://php.ug.cs.usyd.edu.au/%7Ejnot4610/bibref.php?book=%20Exodus&verse=17:9&src=HE - Exodus 17:9 as one of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moses - Moses ' companions (and, according to tradition, later successor). Breaking the name down, we see that there are two parts: יהו Yeho, a theophoric reference to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/YHWH - YHWH , the distinctive personal name of the God of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Israel - Israel , plus the three letter root שוע, relating to the noun shua. Due to disputes over how to render שוע lexically, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Names_and_titles_of_Jesus_in_the_New_Testament#cite_note-0 - [1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Names_and_titles_of_Jesus_in_the_New_Testament#cite_note-1 - [2] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Names_and_titles_of_Jesus_in_the_New_Testament#cite_note-str2-2 - [3] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Names_and_titles_of_Jesus_in_the_New_Testament#cite_note-philo-3 - [4] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Names_and_titles_of_Jesus_in_the_New_Testament#cite_note-bdb2-4 - [5] there are a number of generally accepted phrases this combination can translate to:

Yeho-shua
  • Yhwh saves
  • Yhwh (is) salvation
  • "Yhwh" (is) a saving-cry
  • "Yhwh" (is) a cry-for-saving
  • "Yhwh" (is) a cry-for-help
  • Yhwh (is) my help

Biblical Hebrew יְהוֹשֻׁעַ [Yehoshua`] underwent an orthographical change into the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biblical_Aramaic - Biblical Aramaic (some say late Biblical Hebrew) form יֵשׁוּעַ [Yeshua`] (for example, http://php.ug.cs.usyd.edu.au/%7Ejnot4610/bibref.php?book=%20Ezra&verse=2:2&src=HE - Ezra 2:2 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Names_and_titles_of_Jesus_in_the_New_Testament#cite_note-5 - [6] ) because of a phonological shift where guttural phonemes weakened, including [h]. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Names_and_titles_of_Jesus_in_the_New_Testament#cite_note-6 - [7] Late Biblical Hebrew usually shortened the traditional theophoric element [Yahu] יהו at the beginning of a name to יו [Yo-], and at the end to יה [-yah]. In [Yoshua`], it palatized to [Yeshua`]. This shortened Hebrew name was common - the Hebrew Bible mentions ten individuals called it - and was also adopted by Aramaic- and Greek-speaking Jews.

By the time the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Testament - New Testament was written, the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Septuagint - Septuagint had already transliterated ישוע [Yeshua`] into http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Koine_Greek - Koine Greek as closely as possible in the 3rd-century http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BCE - BCE , the result being Ἰησοῦς [Iēsous]. Where Greek has no equivalent of the semitic letter ש shin [sh], it was replaced with a σ sigma [s], and a masculine singular ending [-s] was added. Many scholars believe some dialects dropped the final letter ע `ayin [`]. The Greek writings of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philo_of_Alexandria - Philo of Alexandria http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Names_and_titles_of_Jesus_in_the_New_Testament#cite_note-Philo-7 - [8] and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Josephus - Josephus frequently mention this name.

From Greek, Ἰησοῦς [Iēsous] moved into http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin - Latin at least by the time of the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vetus_Latina - Vetus Latina . The morphological jump this time was not as large as previous changes between language families. Ἰησοῦς [Iēsous] was http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transliterated - transliterated to Latin IESVS, where it stood for many centuries. The Latin name has an irregular declension, with a genitive, dative, ablative, and vocative of Jesu, accusative of Jesum, and nominative of Jesus. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lower_case - Minuscule (lower case) letters were developed around 800 and some time later the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U - U was invented to distinguish the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vowel - vowel sound from the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Consonant - consonantal sound and the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J - J to distinguish the consonant from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I - I . Similarly, Greek minuscules were invented about the same time, prior to that the name was written in http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capital_letters - Capital letters : ΙΗCΟΥC or abbreviated as: ΙΗC with a line over the top, see also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christogram - Christogram .

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modern_English - Modern English " http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_%28name%29 - Jesus " [ˈdʒi.zəs] derives from Early Middle English Iesu (attested from the 12th century). The name participated in the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Vowel_Shift - Great Vowel Shift in late http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Middle_English - Middle English (15th century). The letter http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J - J was first distinguished from 'I' by the Frenchman http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petrus_Ramus - Pierre Ramus in the 16th, but did not become common in Modern English until the 17th century, so that early 17th century works such as the first edition of the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_James_Version_of_the_Bible - King James Version of the Bible (1611) continued to print the name with an I. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Names_and_titles_of_Jesus_in_the_New_Testament#cite_note-8 - [9]

 



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