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Introduction: Who am I?
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nodda
 
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Quote nodda Replybullet Posted: 23 March 2007 at 4:14am

Salams dear brother. Thanks too much. I  also wish to go to Malysia someday inshaallah, here in Uzbekista we have malaysian university, students can enter ther at their 2 year of university, but their exams are very difficult... So i even didnt dare to go there...... But i've heard that they give excellent education...

 yea i know Ahmad yassavi, Imam Bukhari, Termizi, we used to vizit their tombs, places where they lived & worked... & i'm proud of that i'm from 1 land with a such a great persons... May allah bless them all.

But nowadays not all of us are learing their teachings....... & especialy sufic teachings...  There is one  Sufic school, they have many departments in many regions of Uzbekistan, they are practising Sufic medicine, sufic sport.... Even i havent attent there but  I'm sure it's very intersting.....

 Ok again thanks for the messages, hope to keep in touch. May Allah bless You all...............

 

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Typo Queen
 
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Quote Typo Queen Replybullet Posted: 29 March 2007 at 11:05am

morocco is amazing i have to say

and no im not just saying that because im moroccan:P

Never try and be someone your not

Its a waste of the Person you already are.
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hat2010
 
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Quote hat2010 Replybullet Posted: 19 April 2007 at 5:13pm
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Edited by Jamal Morelli - 30 October 2009 at 3:35pm
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Angela
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Quote Angela Replybullet Posted: 19 April 2007 at 5:30pm
Ah, it seems Servetus has found someone to share in his obscure references. 

I'm intrigued by your podcast Jamal.  I will have to listen when I get to a spot with speakers.  Hopefully it will be something I can add to my meditation music, right next to the Kievan Monks and Tibetan Chants.  I currently have a wonderful copy of the Surah Yusuf on my mp3 player (whereever its disappeared to) but since I don't speak Arabic, its just for the soothing tones of the reciter.  Having Quran that I can listen to on my mp3 player or computer and not worry about language will be great.


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Angela
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Quote Angela Replybullet Posted: 19 April 2007 at 5:32pm


Oh, no, I can't, its only for iPod people.  Will you be doing anything for those of us who refuse to enslave ourselves to Steve Jobs? 


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hat2010
 
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Quote hat2010 Replybullet Posted: 20 April 2007 at 6:21am
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Edited by Jamal Morelli - 30 October 2009 at 3:36pm
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abuzuhri
 
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Quote abuzuhri Replybullet Posted: 20 April 2007 at 9:39am
We like to share Jamal Morelli passion about Maghribi with this beautiful piece of narration dig out 3 years late but still taste fresh like yesterday morning not far from Fez, Meknes and Marrakesh : Here is it....

Journey To Qalbiyya –Morocco Heartland of Islam 2004

 By Daniel Abdal-Hayy Moore

Invited by Morocco’s American Language Center, author Daniel Abdal-Hayy Moore travels the mystical towns of its land to bring his poetry to the children and to portray his love of Islam through his puppet show, “Ameen’s Journey to Qalbiyya” .

If as lovers of Allah you wish to rise
turn to Layla with sincerity in your eyes.

From all who scorn your love turn away
and travel to Allah’s lovers wherever you may.

But if your love is totally sincere
you’ll see Allah’s lovers by staying here.

And if your heart’s vision is pure and fair
You’ll see Her lights shining everywhere

So begins a qasida from the Diwan of Sheikh Muhammad ibn al-Habib of Fez, may God be pleased with him, in a verse version I made from an existing translation as the basis for a puppet play to take to Morocco. Hearing within it the echo of the Qur’anic ayats from God Most High enjoining us to travel the world and see what Allah has done with dif-ferent peoples, joined with the ayats reminding us that wherever we turn, there is the Face of Allah, it makes for a curiously circular adventure as travelers. We end where we begin, in our originally illumined state, if we are open to the heart’s purity of sight.

I was invited with my wife Malika to visit Morocco’s American Language Center in Marrakesh, to begin a tour of its centers beginning there and then north to Meknes, Tetouan, Tangier, and back again to Marrakesh in a three week junket. Initially invited to read my poetry to the students at these centers, the charismatic and imaginative director, Abdurrahman Fitzgerald, got wind of my work with puppets on my website, and wondered if I could also present a puppet play to their younger students of English, some not much more than 10 years old.

I acquiesced, and wrote a play, Ameen’s Journey to Qalbiyya, using puppets I made for a production a few years earlier of The Mystical Love Story of Layla and Majnun. I gave the famous couple cameo appearances in the new play as well, which is essentially the mini-saga of a young hero, Ameen, taking to the Path of Allah, intending to meet people of wisdom on the way to teach him to see Layla’s “lights shining everywhere.” The name Qalbiyya in the title is a made-up place, loosely translated as The Heartland, with the joke in it that if the difficult qaf is mispronounced it becomes Kalbiyya (Dog Town), though I wasn’t sure anyone but me would get the joke, and ultimately few did. I had trouble at first coming up with a story, and emailed the center in Marrakesh asking the students themselves to suggest a story, or at least some characters they would like to see in a play.

The only suggestion was to include the character of Aisha Kandisha, a seductive djinn who apparently is famous for beguiling unsuspecting travelers into falling madly in love with her. Many Moroccan men under her spell even today think of her as their wife, to their ultimate ruin. That was it. One character, no story. But the worldwide web is a true Ali Baba’s treasure cave, and from it I gleaned a Sufi folk tale actually from Marrakesh in which a sultan tricks a wali but the wali overcomes the deception due to his deeper wisdom, and the sultan becomes his disciple. A perfect ending to my puppet play showing Ameen’s successful illumination, and within a few weeks the story was complete. I sent specifications to the carpenter at the center in Marrakesh, and he constructed a stage in three hinged parts, so it could stand on its own, with an opening for the puppets to play in, identical in size to the one of strong cardboard I use from time to time at home.

With sheaves of poems and a large suitcase full of papier-mâché hand-puppets, masks and various props (and worried a bit that immi-gration might think we were smuggling something inside the puppets’ heads), my wife Malika and I took the plane for Marrakesh, a grueling fifteen-or-so hour journey via Heathrow in London, and landed at dusk at the small, quiet, balmy Marrakesh airport, greeted by our hosts, one already known to us, the others new to us but somehow familiar in that uncanny way that often happens, especially with people of dhikr.

The play was entitled Ameen’s Journey to Qalbiyya for a definite reason, as I had been given the name Ameen by a blind wali from Laghouat, Algeria, named Hajj ‘Issa, in the late 70s when I traveled there in the company of five other disciples of our sheikh in Meknes, who died in 1972. And for me this return visit to Morocco after thirty years was a real return to my “heart-land,” to reignite a connection to the tariqa tradition there in Meknes, a tradition that is still vibrant in Morocco in spite of recent fundamentalist encroachments. For Morocco was the first place in which the heart of my Islam was nourished, back in 1970, when I first became Muslim, when we traveled from Berkeley to London and from there to Meknes to attend a giant Mawlid for the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allah be upon him), and the Moussem for our sheikh a few days later, sheikh Muhammad ibn al-Habib, then over a hundred years old. And it was in Morocco that I tasted the elegance and refinement of the courtesies (adaab) of Islam, even among rougher Berbers and mountainmen from the high Atlas, the freshly minted behaviors in imitation of the Prophet Muhammad, peace and blessings of Allah be upon him, which were so sincerely and enthusiastically expressed that it seemed as if the Prophet was perhaps just down the street and that the love these people had for him was fresh from his living presence.

So it was with this high expectation that we traveled at the end of April of 2004, the time also coinciding with the annual Moussem in Meknes; a chance to meet the lovers of Allah and His Prophet in a country whose eagerness for courtesy and welcome has not diminished in the transpiring years away. As God Most High says on the tongue of His Prophet, peace be upon him: “I am as My servant thinks of Me …”

From all who scorn your love turn away
and travel to Allah’s lovers wherever you may.

MARRAKESH

Marrakesh is an almost mythic city to my post-Beat poet’s soul. So many of the 60s writers and cultural icons spent time on its rooftops and winding streets, and at the famous Djemma el-Fna, entranced by the smoky decadence of it all, absorbing its exotic delights. This many years later, though, and as a Muslim, I had come not for “beat” pleasures, but to visit students and awliyya, alive or in eternity, and hearken to their songs.


To be continued...
abuzuhri shin
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Angela
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Quote Angela Replybullet Posted: 25 April 2007 at 9:21am

Thanks Jamal.  I'll keep my eye out.

A friend just told me about a piece of software that supposedly can transfer iTunes files into standard mp3.  I'll have to check it and see.  If it works.  I'll let you know.

I found my Samsung mp3 player so now I'm on a quest. 

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