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herjihad
 
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Quote herjihad Replybullet Topic: Who was Kwame Ture?
    Posted: 20 June 2006 at 9:52am

Bismillah,

I was wondering, so I looked it up.

‘Black Power’ activist dies at 57

Kwame Ture, formerly Stokely Carmichael, was fiery crusader
for civil rights
 

Kwame Ture, then known as Stokely Carmichael, was repeatedly cheered as he addressed a rally in Will Rogers park in Watts in 1966.
Kwame Ture, who as Stokely Carmichael made the phrase “black power” a rallying cry of the civil rights upheavals of the 1960s, died Sunday in Guinea, a member of Ture’s All-African People’s Revolutionary Party said. He was 57.
‘He was one of our generation who was determined to give his life to transforming America and Africa.’ 
REV. JESSE JACKSON
SHARON SOBUKWE, a member of the organization in Philadelphia, said Ture died of prostate cancer. She learned of his death from Amadou Ly, an AAPRP member and one of Ture’s closest friends, who was with him when he died.
       The Rev. Jesse Jackson said he visited with Ture three times at his home in Guinea during a trip to Africa last week.
       “In many ways he was at peace with himself,” Jackson said in a telephone interview from Washington. “He wanted for his last days to be in Guinea and in West Africa. ... He wanted to be amongst the people of Africa.
       “He was one of our generation who was determined to give his life to transforming America and Africa,” Jackson added. “He was committed to ending racial apartheid in our country. He helped to bring those walls down.”
       Ture was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 1996. A self-described socialist, he was treated in Cuba and received financial help for his treatment from Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan.

FORMER BLACK PANTHER
       As the young Carmichael, he was among the most fiery and visible leaders of black militancy in the United States in the 1960s, first as head of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and then as prime minister of the Black Panther Party

Stokely Carmichael quotes from the book 'Malcolm X Speaks' during an address in 1971 at the opening of the 'Third World Conference' at the University of Houston, in Texas. Image: Toure Carmichael
      He cut his ties with the American groups over the issue of allying with white radicals and moved to Guinea in West Africa in 1969. There, with a new name taken from the African leaders Kwame Nkrumah and Ahmed Sekou Toure, he organized the All-African People’s Revolutionary Party.
       For the rest of his life, both overseas and in appearances before largely black audiences at U.S. colleges, Ture continued preaching black power and championing socialism while condemning America, capitalism and Zionism.
       Born in Trinidad on June 29, 1941, and raised there and in New York, Ture described himself as a pliant acceptor of white dominion while growing up.
       He recalled in a 1967 interview in the London Observer that as a boy in the Trinidad capital of Port-of-Spain, he and his black schoolmates “went to the movies and yelled for Tarzan to beat the hell out of Africa.”
       “I’m angry because I didn’t rebel,” he said.
       At age 11, his parents brought him to New York, where the bright youngster attended the academically elite Bronx High School of Science and moved in a liberal, middle-class white circle that he later reviled as phony.
       In 1960, he enrolled at Howard, the predominantly black university in Washington, D.C., where he received a degree in philosophy and plunged into the civil rights revolution.

FREEDOM RIDES

‘We want control of the institutions of the communities where we live and we want to stop the exploitation of nonwhite people around the world.’ 
KWAME TURE
       In a time when black college students were being beaten and arrested for daring to sit at whites-only Southern lunch counters, Carmichael joined the first freedom rides — bus trips aimed at desegregating public transportation — and suffered the first of what was to be about three dozen jailings when he reached Mississippi.
       As an SNCC field organizer there later, he led a perilous voter registration effort that raised black enrollment from 70 to 2,600 in Lowndes County, 300 more than the white registration.
       In June 1966, three weeks before his 25th birthday, he was elected national chairman of the SNCC and shortly afterward raised the cry of “black power” as he led a freedom march in Mississippi.
       Responding to those who called the slogan racist and inflammatory, he wrote that by black power he meant political and economic empowerment. “We want control of the institutions of the communities where we live and we want to stop the exploitation of nonwhite people around the world,” he said in the New York Review of Books.
       He also took an anti-America message to Cuba and North Vietnam and critics said his speeches at home, and those of his successor, H. Rap Brown, had effectively removed the word “nonviolent” from the SNCC’s name.
       In 1968, he left the SNCC for the Black Panthers, but broke with that urban-guerrilla movement the following year because it favored working with radical whites. He said history showed such alliances had “led to complete subversion of the blacks by the whites.”
       Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., who met Carmichael in the freedom rides of 1961 and preceded him as chairman of the SNCC, said he would be remembered “as one of the more militant of spokespersons of that period. He held strong views in terms of civil rights and civil liberties, both here and in Africa.”
       Lewis said the concept of black power “raised the consciousness of people, but it frightened a lot of people.”

PAN-AFRICANISM

‘All we got to do is show (blacks) who the enemy is. At least they’re ready to shoot.’ 
KWAME TURE
       From Guinea, where he had moved with his then-wife, South African-born singer and political activist Miriam Makeba, he declared himself a Pan Africanist with a goal of forming “one cohesive force to wage an unrelenting armed struggle against the white Western empire for the liberation of our people.”
       He long hoped to see a single, socialist state for all of Africa, which would give Africans there and abroad — he rejected the term “African-American” — pride and power.
       Although he denied being anti-Semitic, his condemnations of Israel and Zionism, particularly before U.S. campus audiences in the early 1990s, led the Anti-Defamation League to say, “He remains a disturbing, polarizing figure.”
       Asked at one campus lecture to comment about black-on-black violence, he said: “All we got to do is show (blacks) who the enemy is. At least they’re ready to shoot.”
       Ture is survived by his mother, three sisters and two sons, the AAPRP added.
       Services in the United States, Africa, Britain and the Caribbean will be organized by the AAPRP, the group said. 
Al-Hamdulillah (From a Married Muslimah) La Howla Wa La Quwata Illa BiLLah - There is no Effort or Power except with Allah's Will.
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Suleyman
 
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Quote Suleyman Replybullet Posted: 20 June 2006 at 1:42pm

BOB MARLEY/AFRICAN HERBSMAN

All twinklin' lee
Can't see the right rose when the streams abate
The old slave men might grind slow
But it grinds fine, yeah

African herbsman, why linger on?
Just concentrate, 'cause heaven lives on
Greet-I-eth slave men will look with a scorn
With a transplanted heart (yes, how quick they had to part)
(... how quick they had to part)

The remembrance of today
Is the sad feelin' of tomorrow
(... how quick ...) Oh (... part), oh yeah

African herbsman, seize your time
I'm takin' illusion on the edge of my mind
I'm takin' losers down thru my life
Down thru my life, yeah (yes, how quick they had to part)
(... how quick they had to part)

Dideh part, yes, they part
In remembrance of today
(... how quick they had to part)

African herbsman, why linger on?
Just concentrate, 'cause your heaven lives on
Greet-I-eth slave men will look with a scorn
With a transplanted heart, yes, how (... quick they have to part)
(... how quick they have to part)

In remembrance of today
Brings sad feelings of tomorrow
(Yes, how quick they have to ...) Lead me on, oh, Lord, I pray to you

(African herbsman) (African herbsman)
African, African herbsman ...

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herjihad
 
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Quote herjihad Replybullet Posted: 20 June 2006 at 1:53pm

Bismillah,

Elucidate and enlighten us Brother.  Did he write this for Ture?

Peace

Al-Hamdulillah (From a Married Muslimah) La Howla Wa La Quwata Illa BiLLah - There is no Effort or Power except with Allah's Will.
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Angela
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Quote Angela Replybullet Posted: 20 June 2006 at 1:54pm

‘All we got to do is show (blacks) who the enemy is. At least they’re ready to shoot.’ 
KWAME TURE

 

I think I will continue to honor Dr. King and Malcom X (after his leaving the NoI for true Islam).  No one should call for the death of another.  I agree with the desire to throw off oppression and work for equality.  I disagree with inciting death in order to gain those things. 

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Quote Knowledge01 Replybullet Posted: 20 June 2006 at 4:32pm

If your interested in Kwame Ture, you should also be interested in Kwame Nkrumah and Seku Ture who were the leaders of the Ghana Revolution and Guinea Revolution and who Kwame Ture studied directly under.  Information about all three people can be found at http://www.members.aol.com/aaprp/

 

Here is some more information on Kwame Ture.

http://www.members.aol.com/aaprp/ktanc.html

http://www.members.aol.com/aaprp/kwame.html

http://www.thetalkingdrum.com/kwame.html

http://kwameture.com/

 

I also recommend reading Kwame Ture's autobiography titled "Ready For Revolution".

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Quote Muslima Replybullet Posted: 27 June 2006 at 3:41am
MashAllah! He was a good man!! I will read the autobiography sister! Thank you!!!
Allah Ou Akbar!
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Knowledge01
 
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Quote Knowledge01 Replybullet Posted: 27 June 2006 at 8:42am

Originally posted by Muslima

MashAllah! He was a good man!! I will read the autobiography sister! Thank you!!!

Alhamdulillah.  His autobiography is VERY good and holds a HUGE amount of knowledge.  I, myself, own it and re-read it every once in a while and learn something new every time, just like Al-Qur'an! 

The book is available just about everywhere for a reasonable price.  It is a little bit more than 800 pages so it should cost no more than $25.  I received mine from www.amazon.com

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Quote Muslima Replybullet Posted: 27 June 2006 at 8:53am

I will buy it for sure! Also, I have the autobiography of Malcom X that I love!!

I want to read more by texts the black Panthers.

Salam

Allah Ou Akbar!
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