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Message Icon Topic: Saudi Girl sentenced in own rape(Topic Closed Topic Closed) Post Reply Post New Topic
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peacemaker
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bullet Posted: 21 November 2007 at 10:19am

Originally posted by Angela


(to Mod's - DO NOT MOVE)

Okay. I will do my best not to move this thread. Any action would be taken only if the thread becomes very much off-topic or/and many violations have taken place in that. But, please don’t ask this favor again as rules apply to everyone.  

P.S. You may also like to see relevant interpretation in the following link:

http://www.islamicity.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=10721&am p;PN=1



Edited by peacemaker
Then which of the favours of your Lord will ye deny?
Qur'an 55:13
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mariyah
 
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bullet Posted: 21 November 2007 at 6:00pm
Assalaau alaikum;
From MASNET.org Email:


Saudi Arabia: Rape Victim Punished for Speaking Out

Court Doubles Sentence for Victim, Bans Her Lawyer From the Case

(New York, November 17, 2007) – A court in Saudi Arabia doubled its sentence of lashings for a rape victim who had spoken out in public about her case and her efforts to seek justice, Human Rights Watch said today. The court also harassed her lawyer, banning him from the case and confiscating his professional license.

An official at the General Court of Qatif, which handed down the sentence on November 14, said the court had increased the woman’s sentence because of “her attempt to aggravate and influence the judiciary through the media.” The court sentenced the rape victim to six months in prison and 200 lashes, more than double its October 2006 sentence after its earlier verdict was reviewed by Saudi Arabia’s highest court, the Supreme Council of the Judiciary.  
 
Human Rights Watch called on King Abdullah to immediately void the verdict and drop all charges against the rape victim and to order the court to end its harassment of her lawyer.  
 
“A courageous young woman faces lashing and prison for speaking out about her efforts to find justice,” said Farida Deif, researcher in the women’s rights division of Human Rights Watch. “This verdict not only sends victims of sexual violence the message that they should not press charges, but in effect offers protection and impunity to the perpetrators.”  
 
The young woman, who is married, said she had met with a male acquaintance who had promised to give her back an old photograph of herself. After she met her acquaintance in his car in Qatif, a gang of seven men then attacked and raped both of them, multiple times. Despite the prosecution’s requests for the maximum penalty for the rapists, the Qatif court sentenced four of them to between one and five years in prison and between 80 and 1,000 lashes. They were convicted of kidnapping, apparently because prosecutors could not prove rape. The judges reportedly ignored evidence from a mobile phone video in which the attackers recorded the assault.  
 
Moreover, the court in October 2006 also sentenced both the woman and man who had been raped to 90 lashes each for what it termed “illegal mingling.” Human Rights Watch is particularly concerned that the criminalization of any contact between unmarried individuals of the opposite sex in Saudi Arabia severely impedes the ability of rape victims to seek justice. A court may view a woman’s charge of rape as an admission of extramarital sexual relations (or “illegal mingling”) unless she can prove, by strict evidentiary standards, that this contact was legal and the intercourse was nonconsensual.  
 
In an interview in December, the rape victim described to Human Rights Watch her treatment in court:  
     
    “At the first session, [the judges] said to me, ‘what kind of relationship did you have with this individual? Why did you leave the house? Do you know these men?’ They asked me to describe the situation. They used to yell at me. They were insulting. The judge refused to allow my husband in the room with me. One judge told me I was a liar because I didn’t remember the dates well. They kept saying, ‘Why did you leave the house? Why didn’t you tell your husband [where you were going]?’”  
 
“Victims of sexual violence in Saudi Arabia face enormous obstacles in the criminal justice system,” said Deif. “Their interrogations and court hearings are more likely to compound the trauma of the original assault than provide justice.”  
 
During the recent hearings, Judge al-Muhanna of the Qatif court also banned the woman’s lawyer, Abd al-Rahman al-Lahim, from the courtroom and from any future representations of her, without apparent reason. He also confiscated his lawyer’s identification card, which the Ministry of Justice issues. Al-Lahim faces a disciplinary hearing at the Ministry of Justice on December 5, where sanctions can include suspension for three years and disbarment.  
 
Al-Lahim, who is Saudi Arabia’s best-known human rights lawyer, earlier this year had planned to take legal action against the Ministry of Justice for failing to provide him with a copy of the verdict against his client so that he could prepare an appeal. Despite numerous representations to the court and the ministry, he was not given a copy of the case file or the verdict.  
 
“The decision to ban the rape victim’s lawyer from the case shows what little respect Saudi authorities have for the legal profession or the law in general,” said Sarah Leah Whitson, Middle East director at Human Rights Watch.  
 
On October 3, King Abdullah announced a judicial reform, promising new specialized courts and training for judges and lawyers. There is currently no rule of law in Saudi Arabia, which does not have a written penal code. Judges do not follow procedural rules and issue arbitrary sentences that vary widely. Often, judges do not provide written verdicts, even in death penalty cases. Judges sometimes deny individuals their right to legal representation. In May 2006, a judge in Jeddah had thrown a lawyer out of his courtroom in a civil suit on the sole basis that he is of the Isma’ili faith, a branch of Shiism. Trials remain closed to the public.  



Related Material

Saudi Arabia: Officials Harass Forcibly Divorced Couple
Press Release, July 17, 2007

Saudi Arabia: Lift Gag-Order on Rights Campaigner


This does not seem Islamic at all...In the case of condemning someone to lashes according to Quranic Dictate, Where are the 3 to 4 witnesses? It is sad to see the keeper of the Holy Places give such an example to the world. But again there are things we do not know it was a closed hearing, But Allah subanallah wa'taala sees all, and if there is a grave misjustice here, they will have to answer for it.


"Every good deed is charity whether you come to your brother's assistance or just greet him with a smile.
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Salams_wife
 
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bullet Posted: 21 November 2007 at 6:21pm

As far as I am concerned, there is never an excuse to rape a woman.  It does not matter if she walked down the street with hardly any clothing on.  It never gives any man the right to force himself on any woman.  If he actually believes he can, then he should be put into a mental institution and have his sanity checked.  I will not even get started on how I feel about using young boys in the wrong way.  That is just sick.

Even if many countries, even the United States, fail the punish rapists properly.  I know rapists still have to face their misdeads on the day of judgement.  Every good muslim man knows the only person he should be with is his wife.  No other person is allowed for him, so there is never an excuse for relations outside the marriage.  Whether the woman, man or child consents or not. 



Edited by Salams_wife
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Cassandra
 
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bullet Posted: 22 November 2007 at 3:17am

It seems to me that this thread has been dealing more with the outrage we all should feel when someone is violated (female or male) and less to do with this specific case (and by implication any other which would follow this precedent, and of course, those which have come before).

The woman was gang raped for breaking a law which seems to most of us (I sincerely hope) archaic and discriminatory.  That we know.

She made a very foolish mistake, and is paying for it out of all proportion to the deed.

But it is the sentence itself which is the topic we should be addressing, not only because she was the victim, but also because when she tried to establish her rights as a human female, her sentence was increased even more!  Not surprisingly, most of the world will condemn this.

But, we are not finished yet...her lawyer, who, clearly taking his responsibilities as a first line of defence, was not only chastised severely, but has had his livelihood taken away from him.

What possible sense can any of us make about this?

And while I am about it: Today, on the news, I see that there has been "outrage" in the US.  Hillary Clinton is quoted as saying she will make human rights a priority "when" she becomes President.  Hillary, get involved NOW, and stop using this poor woman´s tragedy and the very shame we feel - as human beings when reading of the terrible injustices perpetrated in a country populated with too many hypocritical men - as an electioneeering ploy.

No doubt the last paragraph will get deleted.  But do comment, please.

 

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bullet Posted: 22 November 2007 at 5:00am
Originally posted by Cassandra

It seems to me that this thread has been dealing more with the outrage we all should feel when someone is violated (female or male) and less to do with this specific case (and by implication any other which would follow this precedent, and of course, those which have come before).

The woman was gang raped for breaking a law which seems to most of us (I sincerely hope) archaic and discriminatory.  That we know.

She made a very foolish mistake, and is paying for it out of all proportion to the deed.

But it is the sentence itself which is the topic we should be addressing, not only because she was the victim, but also because when she tried to establish her rights as a human female, her sentence was increased even more!  Not surprisingly, most of the world will condemn this.

But, we are not finished yet...her lawyer, who, clearly taking his responsibilities as a first line of defence, was not only chastised severely, but has had his livelihood taken away from him.

What possible sense can any of us make about this?

And while I am about it: Today, on the news, I see that there has been "outrage" in the US.  Hillary Clinton is quoted as saying she will make human rights a priority "when" she becomes President.  Hillary, get involved NOW, and stop using this poor woman´s tragedy and the very shame we feel - as human beings when reading of the terrible injustices perpetrated in a country populated with too many hypocritical men - as an electioneeering ploy.

No doubt the last paragraph will get deleted.  But do comment, please.

 

Salaams,

Why would the paragraph about Hilary get deleted?  I don't care what Hilary says anyway.  She's just another paid politician.

I would like to hear what the Saudis are saying to each other in their living rooms about this.  I imagine many moms and dads think that their daughters and sons would never be caught out breaking the law, but maybe a few realize that their daughters and sons are vulnerable, and would like to make changes, but they don't have the power to do so.  How could we help them?  I have no idea.  Prayers for sure.

Al-Hamdulillah (From a Married Muslimah) La Howla Wa La Quwata Illa BiLLah - There is no Effort or Power except with Allah's Will.
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bullet Posted: 22 November 2007 at 6:24am

Hillary is safe enough (so far); it's the Saudi hosts of this Forum I worry about!!!

Salaams to you too.....

Cassi

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Saladin
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bullet Posted: 23 November 2007 at 1:08am

  I have come across many incidents like this across the muslim world,where victims are further victimised.I am not an expert in shariah but i wonder if the girl here hasn't suffered enough[or more] for her mistake.I mean rape; is the most traumatic experience a girl could go through.Its the same for boys too.I also wonder why the rapists weren't stoned to death.Is this the judgement Prophet Muhammad[pbuh] would have handed out for this case?

'Trust everyone but not the devil in them'
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Angela
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bullet Posted: 04 December 2007 at 3:22am
I agree, Saladin.

My outrage at this stuff knows no bounds.  There is a case going before the Supreme Court here in the US in the future.  Louisiana has a law on the books that allows for the death penalty for a rapist of a child.  Its finally been handed out and the rapist is fighting it. 

I pray that the Supreme Court upholds this sentence and it encourages other states to enact this law on their books.  Maybe if the rapists and child molesters faced death for their crimes against women and children they would think twice before they commit these crimes.

I think its too easy to blame the victims.  I had a friend who was raped.  The cops treated her poorly and it was never fully investigated because she had been longtime friends with the man and she had gone to his dorm room to visit him.  They didn't believe her that she had said no and that he forced her.  She was made to feel like a harlot and she was a good girl.  She was not someone who did those kind of things.

Question for us as women/society is, how do we protect our daughters from this kind of thing?  Obviously, forced segregation doesn't work?  Neither does feminist rhetoric about empowerment?

Really, I think the focus needs to be on the men, not the women.
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