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•  WARNING
•  The Mystery of Matter
•  The World of Electrical Signals
•  How do We See?
•  "The External World" is Inside the Brain
•  Is the Existence of the "External World" Indispensable?
•  The World in Our Dreams
•  Who is the Perceiver?
•  The Real Absolute Being
•  Everything that you Possess Is Intrinsically Illusory
•  Logical Defects of the Materialists
•  The Example of Dreams
•  The Example of Connecting the Nerves in Parallel
•  There is no Scientific Evidence that Perceptions have Physical Correlates
•  The Formation of Perceptions in the Brain is not Philosophy but Scientific Fact
•  Conclusion


 



Who is the Perceiver?

As we have related so far, there is no doubt of the fact that the world we think we are inhabiting and that we call the "external world" is created inside our brain. However, here arises the question of primary importance. If all the physical events that we know of are intrinsically perceptions, what about our brain? Since our brain is a part of the physical world just like our arm, leg, or any other object, it also should be a perception just like all other objects.

An example about dreams will illuminate the subject further. Let us think that we see the dream within our brain in accordance with what has been said so far. In the dream, we will have an imaginary body, an imaginary arm, an imaginary eye, and an imaginary brain. If during our dream we were asked "where do you see?", we would answer "I see in my brain". Yet, actually there is not any brain to talk about, but an imaginary head and an imaginary brain. The seer of the images is not the imaginary brain in the dream, but a "being" that is far "superior" to it.

The brain is a heap of cells made up of protein and fat molecules. It is formed of nerve cells called neurons. There is no power in this piece of meat to observe the images, to constitute consciousness, or to create the being we call "myself".

We know that there is no physical distinction between the setting of a dream and the setting we call real life. So when we are asked in the setting we call real life the above question of "where do you see", it would be just as meaningless to answer "in my brain" as in the example above. In both conditions, the entity that sees and perceives is not the brain, which is after all only a hunk of meat. 

When the brain is analysed, it is seen that there is nothing in it but lipid and protein molecules, which also exist in other living organisms. This means that within the piece of meat we call our "brain", there is nothing to observe the images, to constitute consciousness, or to create the being we call "myself". 

This is the very point which puts the materialists, who do not hold anything but the matter as true, in a quandary. 

The book in your hand, the room you are in, in brief, all the images in front of you are seen inside your brain. Is it the atoms that see these images? Blind, deaf, unconscious atoms? Why did some atoms acquire this quality whereas some did not? Do our acts of thinking, comprehending, remembering, being delighted, being unhappy, and everything else consist of the electrochemical reactions between these atoms?

We know that there is no physical distinction between the setting of a dream and the setting we call real life. So when we are asked in the setting we call real life the above question of "where do you see", it would be just as meaningless to answer "in my brain" as in the example above. In both conditions, the entity that sees and perceives is not the brain, which is after all only a hunk of meat.

When the brain is analysed, it is seen that there is nothing in it but lipid and protein molecules, which also exist in other living organisms. This means that within the piece of meat we call our "brain", there is nothing to observe the images, to constitute consciousness, or to create the being we call "myself".

This is the very point which puts the materialists, who do not hold anything but the matter as true, in a quandary.

The book in your hand, the room you are in, in brief, all the images in front of you are seen inside your brain. Is it the atoms that see these images? Blind, deaf, unconscious atoms? Why did some atoms acquire this quality whereas some did not? Do our acts of thinking, comprehending, remembering, being delighted, being unhappy, and everything else consist of the electrochemical reactions between these atoms?

When we ponder these questions, we see that there is no sense in looking for will in atoms. It is clear that the being who sees, hears, and feels is a supra-material being. This being is "alive" and it is neither matter nor an image of matter. This being associates with the perceptions in front of it by using the image of our body.

This being is the "soul".

The aggregate of perceptions we call the "material world" is a dream observed by this soul. Just as the body we possess and the material world we see in our dreams have no reality, the universe we occupy and the body we possess also have no material reality.

The real being is the soul. Matter consists merely of perceptions viewed by the soul. The intelligent beings that write and read these lines are not each a heap of atoms and molecules-and the chemical reactions between them-but a "soul".

All the images we view in our lives are formed in our centre of vision at the back of our brain, which makes up only a few cubic centimetres of the volume of the brain. Both the book you are now reading and the boundless landscape you see when you gaze at the horizon fit into this tiny space. Therefore, we see objects not in their actual size existing outside, but in the size perceived by our brain.

Dreams may be as realistic as real life. A person may even experience emotions and get excited in his dream in a genuine way not distinguishable from real life.

Next : The Real Absolute Being        


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